In Concert! Musical Instruments in Art, 1860-1910

Exhibition from March 24 to July 2, 2017


The beginnings of impressionism coincided with the arrival of new musical instruments and the increasing importance of music in everyday life, with cafés-concerts, dances and operas in particular all flourishing.


Manet, Degas, Renoir, Morisot, Whistler, Toulouse-Lautrec and Bonnard were simultaneously witnesses to, and protagonists in, these changes during a period of growing leisure. Furthermore, a ‘new music’ emerged in parallel with this ‘new painting’. A wave of modernity and freedom swept through music, which broke with traditional conventions.


The hundred works or so on display trace the growing presence of music in painting. Depictions of public performances — brass bands, circuses, cabarets, orchestras, operas, festivals – rub shoulders with more intimate scenes featuring parlour music and music lessons. This exhibition illustrates the close links that developed between painters and musicians.
 

Discover the exhibition trailer

Discover the exhibition video (only in French)


We are grateful to the Conseil départemental de l'Eure for this video and especially to Fabien Anquetin.


Curators:
Frédéric Frank, director of the musée des impressionnismes Giverny
Belinda Thomson, independent art historian and Honorary Professor at the University of Edinburgh


With the exceptionnal support of

 


"Un espace pour une oeuvre"

The musée des impressionnismes Giverny takes part in the "Un espace pour une œuvre" project organized by the Frac Normandie and exhibits a work from the Frac’s collection chosen in coherence with the museum exhibitions. Thus it intends to favor links between Impressionism and contemporary practices. The Frac proposes to close the exhibition In Concert! with a panoramic image of the Royal Albert Hall designed by Julien Audebert and extracted from the famous film by Alfred Hitchcock The Man Who Knew Too Much.


Patrons


The Caisse d'Épargne Normandie supports this exhibition

 

The exhibition has been painted using colours
by craftsmen in paint and wallpaper, Farrow & Ball

 

     

 


Media partners


       

        

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